nine about #documenta14 - Athens

Five years ago I was more into photography rather than art in general so I wasn't aware of the exhibition called documenta which is taking place every five years in Kassel, Germany and this year also in Athens, Greece. Andreea took me to Athens where the exhibition is extended over the city in more than 40 different public institutions, squares, cinemas, university locations, and libraries with over 160 international artists who will show works newly conceived for documenta 14. Here are ten artists that I would recommend to follow. 

Bonita Evy

"For Bonita Ely, who was born in Australia in 1946 and works in Sydney, an ecology is a system of interdependence in which different elements support and sustain each other. In harmony, an ecology is strong; when disrupted, its fragility manifests." — Hendrik Folkerts

Installation by Bonita Evy for documenta14 Athens, photo by Constantin Nimigean

Installation by Bonita Evy for documenta14 Athens, photo by Constantin Nimigean

AGNES DENES

"Denes’s study into dynamic patterning is best witnessed in her series of pyramids: there are pyramids created from 11,000 fir trees, blocks of crystal, and microscopic piles of human dust; there are drawn pyramids that morph into snail shells, flying birds, and manta rays. Some are made of Plexiglas filled with oil and polluted water, others are prototypes for future cities. One of the largest realized is The Living Pyramid (2015), installed at Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, New York. Constructed of stacked wooden terraces filled with soil and thousands of various living plants, the sculpture arcs nine meters up toward the sky. It is a social structure. Social because the planted material conveys ideas of evolution and regeneration; the work also cultivates a micro-society of people responsible for its planting and ongoing care." — Candice Hopkins

Roee Rosen

"Live and Die as Eva Braun (1995–97)Rosen’s trailblazing installation and book of 1995–97, compel viewers to identify with and indeed become Hitler’s mistress. The work lays out a script that inverts the parameters of accepted histories and gives voice to the absurdity and obscenity of what is deemed unspeakable. Stringent on the textual level of the script, and delirious and hallucinatory on the painterly one, the work as a whole constitutes an elaborate, provocative meta-commentary on the politics of remembrance and identity formation, specifically the use and abuse of the Holocaust in present-day Israel." — Hila Peleg

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André Pierre

"André Pierre (1915–2005) was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti around 1915. At an early age he moved to Croix-des-Missions, on the outskirts of the capital, where he made his living as a farmer. A practitioner of Voudou since childhood, Pierre met the American filmmaker Maya Deren in the late 1940's. Deren had come to Haiti to make a film on dance, and had become an initiate in the houmfour where Pierre was La Place, second in command. The houmfour was decorated with gourds on which Pierre had painted images of vodou spirits. Deren suggested that he should paint on canvas and offer his paintings to the Centre d'Art, which he did." — Galerie Macondo.

© André Pierre

© André Pierre

Andrzej Wróblewski

Andrzej Wróblewski (15 June 1927 - 23 March 1957) was a Polish figurative painter who died in a mountaineering accident in 1957 when he was only 29. He is recognised by many as one of Poland's most prominent artists in the early post World War II era, creating distinctly individualistic approach to representational art. He was the author of over 150 oil paintings, 1400 drawings, dozens of other art forms and over 80 published articles. His works are featured in the collections of many Polish museums and exhibitions. — Culture.pl

Andrzej Wróblewski, Self - portrait with Glass Reflection, b&w photography, 5,2 x 8,4 cm, courtesy of Andrzej WróblewskiFoundation

Andrzej Wróblewski, Self - portrait with Glass Reflection, b&w photography, 5,2 x 8,4 cm, courtesy of Andrzej WróblewskiFoundation

© Andrzej Wróblewski, photo by Constantin Nimigean

© Andrzej Wróblewski, photo by Constantin Nimigean

Beau Dick

"In Dick’s hands, masks are not simply masks, they are animate beings that have important roles outside the confines of contemporary art. He is continually short-circuiting their status as a commodity. In 2012, he removed the forty Atlakim (Forest) masks from the walls of his gallery and brought them back to his community in Alert Bay, where they were danced for a final time and then ceremonially burned. There is rebirth within this destruction, as now there is a responsibility to carve a new set of masks, which in turn keeps them alive." — Candice Hopkins

© Beau Dick, photo by Constantin Nimigean

© Beau Dick, photo by Constantin Nimigean

© Beau Dick, photo by Constantin Nimigean

© Beau Dick, photo by Constantin Nimigean

Cecilia Vicuña

Blown up to the monumental proportions of immersive “soft sculpture,” her recent Athenian quipoem consists of giant strands of untreated wool, sourced from a local Greek provider, dyed a startling crimson in honor of a syncretic religious tradition that, via the umbilical cord of menstrual symbolism, connects Andean mother goddesses with the maritime mythologies of ancient Greece. — Dieter Roelstraete

Emeka Ogboh

"Ogboh explores how private, public, and collective memories and historiographies are translated, transformed, transcribed, and engraved in sound and sonority. Such is the case when he rummages through the archives for documents about financial crises from 1929 to the present day. These data are transformed into musical scores by a Greek and an Igbo composer, creating short narrative histories of how capitalism backfires for The Way Earthly Things Are Going (2017)" — Bonaventure Soh Bejeng Ndikung

The Way Earthly Things Are Going (2017) © Emeka Ogboh, photo by Constantin Nimigean

The Way Earthly Things Are Going (2017) © Emeka Ogboh, photo by Constantin Nimigean

Kettly Noël

"An actress in front of Sissako’s camera, Kettly Noël is better known as a choreographer and contemporary dancer. She was attracted to dance early in her youth in Haiti’s Port-au-Prince, where she was born in 1968. Visitors to documenta 14 will perceive the zombies of voodoo culture in the movement Kettly Noël directs at them, as well as nonfolkloric figures responsible for current, real, globalized violence." — Gérard Mayen

Zombification (2017) © Kettly Noël, photo by Constantin Nimigean

Zombification (2017) © Kettly Noël, photo by Constantin Nimigean

More details about the event on the official website. What was your nine about?